africaisdonesuffering:

Domesticated Religions or Faiths of the Oppressors: Islam and Christianity in Africa
Time and again in discussions about Africa and spirituality arises this idea that Christianity and Islam are faiths of the oppressors; that the practice of these religions not only served to crush indigenous beliefs on the continent but that they are also symbols of an Africa which has embraced the tools its oppressors used in their (old and new) quests to dominate the African peoples. Those who profess such arguments however seem to miss a very crucial point: although the instrumentalization of religion in the various brutalizations committed against Africans cannot be ignored, the introduction of Christianity and Islam go far beyond imperialism, the transatlantic slave trade, and colonization.
The narratives of Islam and Christianity making their way into the African continent through, respectively, the Arabs conquering and forcibly converting the North and the missionaries sent by empires set on sharing a piece of the “African cake” are problematic and ahistorical. They erase, for example, the long legacy of the Christian religion in Ethiopia, which dates back as early as the 1st century AD. And Islam, on the other hand, was practiced on the continent since the 7th century AD when the religion was still new and persecuted Muslims sought refuge in Africa by migrating to what was then known as the kingdom of Axum. While both religions are not indigenous to Africa, they have been domesticated by African people, as both Christianity and Islam have been practiced on the continent “for nearly as long as they have existed” (Olupona 89). (read more)

africaisdonesuffering:

Domesticated Religions or Faiths of the Oppressors: Islam and Christianity in Africa

Time and again in discussions about Africa and spirituality arises this idea that Christianity and Islam are faiths of the oppressors; that the practice of these religions not only served to crush indigenous beliefs on the continent but that they are also symbols of an Africa which has embraced the tools its oppressors used in their (old and new) quests to dominate the African peoples. Those who profess such arguments however seem to miss a very crucial point: although the instrumentalization of religion in the various brutalizations committed against Africans cannot be ignored, the introduction of Christianity and Islam go far beyond imperialism, the transatlantic slave trade, and colonization.

The narratives of Islam and Christianity making their way into the African continent through, respectively, the Arabs conquering and forcibly converting the North and the missionaries sent by empires set on sharing a piece of the “African cake” are problematic and ahistorical. They erase, for example, the long legacy of the Christian religion in Ethiopia, which dates back as early as the 1st century AD. And Islam, on the other hand, was practiced on the continent since the 7th century AD when the religion was still new and persecuted Muslims sought refuge in Africa by migrating to what was then known as the kingdom of Axum. While both religions are not indigenous to Africa, they have been domesticated by African people, as both Christianity and Islam have been practiced on the continent “for nearly as long as they have existed” (Olupona 89). (read more)

udochukwu:

Niké Art Gallery, Lagos.

(Various Artists)

(via lagosphotos)

prepaidafrica:

Etisalat 2014 Innovation Prize focus on Mobile Broadband – Deadline 7th August 2014 | The Prepaid Economy

amroyounes:

8 vegetables that you can regrow again and again.

Scallions

You can regrow scallions by leaving an inch attached to the roots and place them in a small glass with a little water in a well-lit room.

Garlic

When garlic begins to sprout, you can put them in a glass with a little water and grow garlic sprouts. The sprouts have a mild flavor than garlic and can be added to salads, pasta and other dishes.

Bok Choy

Bok choy can be regrown by placing the root end in water in a well-lit area. In 1-2 weeks , you can transplant it to a pot with soil and grow a full new head.

Carrots

Put carrot tops in a dish with a little water. Set the dish in a well-lit room or a window sill.  You’ll have carrot tops to use in salads. 

Basil

Put clippings from basil with 3 to 4-inch stems in a glass of water and place it in direct sunlight. When the roots are about 2 inches long, plant them in pots to and in time it will grow a full basil plant.

Celery

Cut off the base of the celery and place it in a saucer or shallow bowl of warm water in the sun. Leaves will begin to thicken and grow in the middle of the base, then transfer the celery to soil. 

Romaine Lettuce

Put romaine lettuce stumps in a 1/2 inch of water. Re-water to keep water level at 1/2 inch. After a few days, roots and new leaves will appear and you can transplant it into soil.

Cilantro

The stems of cilantro will grown when placed in a glass of water. Once the roots are long enough, plant them in a pot in a well-lit room. You will have a full plant in a few months.

(via xx-blackpanther)

"People believe that little white kids in the suburbs have the right to live. They have the right to be happy. They have the right to peace. When it comes to black babies in urban neighborhoods, people don’t believe these children deserve to have similar rights. When people say things like ‘I can’t believe this would happen here,’ they are effectively saying that there are some neighborhoods where these tragic outcomes are far more acceptable. I reject this notion entirely, and it is reflective of both white supremacy and classism."

The World Cries for Newtown’s Children, but Few of Us Think About Dead Brown Babies, Dr. Boyce Watkins (via eastafrodite)

(Source: maarnayeri, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

africaisdonesuffering:

July 2014: “Let Us Pray”
“We are an Arab, Muslim nation, anyone who does not like it can go,” said Sudan’s President Omar al Bashir. Soon after 2011 was the year when majority Christian Sudanese left Sudan, and formed South Sudan.  In 1989 Sudan undertook a cultural project, which denounced the multi-ethnic, culturally rich Sudan and replaced it with an Islamic theocracy—a religious nation state. In the early years, many women and children fell at the mercy of officers who either humiliated or punished them. Even though the diktats, or rules have loosened over time, occasionally a sweep reminded Sudan’s citizens of what it means to live in a nations whose rules are one in the same as religious rules interpreted by the few for the many.
Sudan is not the only nation that has struggled with keeping church and state separate. Currently, Boko Haram has become a household name for its extremist terrorist bombings, abductions, and rapes of all opposed to strict sharia law. Over 70 days ago, the organization abducted over 300 schoolgirls form their campus in the middle of the night. While about 50 girls escaped, the remaining girls have not been found. Since the abduction, there have been more abductions, killings, and bombings, all in the name of Allah.
All over the continent from the Central African Republic, to Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, Africans wage religious wars all in the name of God. How often are these wars publicly about religion but privately about politics, control, resources, land, and centuries old family disputes?
There is no doubt that African continent is one of the most religious communities in the world. There are churches and mosques in every major city and most rural communities. Even with houses of God casting long shadows of African communities, what have Africans gained from their deeply seeded faith?  Extremist religion has been used in very political ways to criminalize inter-religious marriage, homosexuality, and maintain grave gendered education gap. With a reality as dangerous as that is religion a sword used to cut down the disobedient, and outspoken in society, or staff guiding us together to a life of harmony?
Have Africans accepted the faith of their oppressors without examining the role those religions played in taking over their cultures, traditions, and communities? What role has religion played in some of the most heinous atrocities on the continent? How can religion bring healing where it is the cause of so much distrust and animosity?
Have Christianity and Islam truly made the continent a better place? Is it possible that what we lost was far more precious, more natural, more humane, or is it the interpretations of these foreign religions that has lead to so much violence? Is there room on the continent for indigenous religions as well as more modern faiths? Can the past and future live comfortably together?
This month in Rise Africa we will explore all of these questions and more. Our goal is to develop a connected and empowered global African community, one that has the confidence to speak their voice and the awareness to engage in productive conversations with one another about the shared and unique lives we live as Africans and members of the African Diaspora. We imagine an Africa where we’re all involved. With that being said, as always we value your participation. Share your experiences with, and reflections on conflict on the continent with the Rise Africa community. If you, or someone you know would be interested in participating in this series, we encourage you to contribute. Visit our “Submit a Guest post” page for more information on the guest contribution process and e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com if you have additional questions. Click here to access all articles under our July 2014 theme.

africaisdonesuffering:

July 2014: “Let Us Pray”

We are an Arab, Muslim nation, anyone who does not like it can go,” said Sudan’s President Omar al Bashir. Soon after 2011 was the year when majority Christian Sudanese left Sudan, and formed South Sudan.  In 1989 Sudan undertook a cultural project, which denounced the multi-ethnic, culturally rich Sudan and replaced it with an Islamic theocracy—a religious nation state. In the early years, many women and children fell at the mercy of officers who either humiliated or punished them. Even though the diktats, or rules have loosened over time, occasionally a sweep reminded Sudan’s citizens of what it means to live in a nations whose rules are one in the same as religious rules interpreted by the few for the many.

Sudan is not the only nation that has struggled with keeping church and state separate. Currently, Boko Haram has become a household name for its extremist terrorist bombings, abductions, and rapes of all opposed to strict sharia law. Over 70 days ago, the organization abducted over 300 schoolgirls form their campus in the middle of the night. While about 50 girls escaped, the remaining girls have not been found. Since the abduction, there have been more abductions, killings, and bombings, all in the name of Allah.

All over the continent from the Central African Republic, to Djibouti, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, Africans wage religious wars all in the name of God. How often are these wars publicly about religion but privately about politics, control, resources, land, and centuries old family disputes?

There is no doubt that African continent is one of the most religious communities in the world. There are churches and mosques in every major city and most rural communities. Even with houses of God casting long shadows of African communities, what have Africans gained from their deeply seeded faith?  Extremist religion has been used in very political ways to criminalize inter-religious marriagehomosexuality, and maintain grave gendered education gap. With a reality as dangerous as that is religion a sword used to cut down the disobedient, and outspoken in society, or staff guiding us together to a life of harmony?

Have Africans accepted the faith of their oppressors without examining the role those religions played in taking over their cultures, traditions, and communities? What role has religion played in some of the most heinous atrocities on the continent? How can religion bring healing where it is the cause of so much distrust and animosity?

Have Christianity and Islam truly made the continent a better place? Is it possible that what we lost was far more precious, more natural, more humane, or is it the interpretations of these foreign religions that has lead to so much violence? Is there room on the continent for indigenous religions as well as more modern faiths? Can the past and future live comfortably together?

This month in Rise Africa we will explore all of these questions and more. Our goal is to develop a connected and empowered global African community, one that has the confidence to speak their voice and the awareness to engage in productive conversations with one another about the shared and unique lives we live as Africans and members of the African Diaspora. We imagine an Africa where we’re all involved. With that being said, as always we value your participation. Share your experiences with, and reflections on conflict on the continent with the Rise Africa community. If you, or someone you know would be interested in participating in this series, we encourage you to contribute. Visit our “Submit a Guest post” page for more information on the guest contribution process and e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com if you have additional questions. Click here to access all articles under our July 2014 theme.

asylum-art:

Sara K. Golish: Sundust

on Facebook

Sundust is a new series of ten portraits of fictional sun goddesses by Toronto-based visual artist Sara Golish

(via dynamicafrica)

"Does the white man understand our custom about land?” “How can he when he does not even speak our tongue? But he says that our customs are bad; and our own brothers who have taken up his religion also say that our customs are bad. How do you think we can fight when our own brothers have turned against us? The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused at his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one. He has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart."

— Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (via nigerianostalgia)

(Source: rhyythms, via another-mans-garden)

"Why is it, do you think, that children are always too young to hear the truth, but never too young to be lied to, systematically, conscientiously, in the name of Education?"

Ward Churchill | Perpetual War and State-Sponsored Terrorism (via america-wakiewakie)

(Source: america-wakiewakie, via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

dynamicafrica:

Capoeira Gains Home in DR Congo Building A Connection Between the Continent and the African Diaspora.

In a beautiful show of cultural exchange several hundred years in the making, the Brazilian fight-dance art of capoeira is finding a home in the Democratic Republic of Congo, all thanks to the efforts of Yannick N’salambo Walters.

A scientist by profession, Walters is a passionate and self-described fanatic of capoeira who shares his love of the dance by teaching underprivileged children in Kinshasa. Originally attracted to the dance because of its ancestral connection to his home country, Walters has taken capoeira to the streets of DR Congo’s capital city where it is fast gaining a large and dedicated following.

The development of capoeira by enslaved Africans from the former Central African Kongo Kingdom from a martial arts fighting skill, to a mock-battle game involving dance elements (so as to not be detected and punished by slave masters for engaging in activity relating to fighting) is a show of the ingenuity of the enslaved Africans who pioneered this art form and ultimately managed to preserve an important part of their culture.