ourafrica:

TEDxObserver- Hugh Masekela -The Western Influence on the African youth PLUS music performance

Heritage is beneficial to the society. African stands at the frontline of those that have lost their heritage because of the misconception of education,religion, advertisements, politics and television.

If you impoverish people and take away their land then they are less capable of exhibiting their heritage crafts and their heritage performances. 

It is a thing that has very much disappeared in most of Africa, especially urban Africa because they have been convinced that their heritage is barbaric, evil, backward, primitive and pagan.They have really brought it to an extent where we don’t even try to look like who we really are at any point in our lives.

When people come to Africa these days, they always come to look at the animals, to find Mandela or to look at the geographical size because her heritage( arts and crafts) have more or less disappeared or have been colonized by expatriate businesses.

There is no place that is more diversified and has a cross section of excellent heritage like Africa but it’s invisible. Nobody has the chance to see it  and when they come to Africa, they are escorted to see the elephants,lions and victoria falls.

I am on crusade to at least make it visible and to be involved in building places where heritage performances can take place. To restore the arts and crafts and ownership of what the people do instead of working for expatriate businesses;

I want to point out that  the only artistes  have really made it overseas are those who are heritage arts oriented like Miriam Makeba, Salif Keita,Youssou N’dour, Ladysmith Black Mambazo and myself. I dont think i would have been known if i had come overseas and tried to imitate overseas artistes.

Heritage lives forever. There is no place that needs to see it come back more than the African diaspora and especially the African Continent.

When i speak to a lot of Africans about this they say “why are you trying to take us back to the dark ages?” but my usual answer is “if you don’t know where you are coming from, you are not going anywhere except you are making yourself vulnerable to be swallowed in by other cultures”

People do not even want to stay in their rural homelands anymore, everyone wants to come to the city to find this miracle of the west that does not exist.

There is nothing better than heritage restoration to preserve the history of Africa and also to make the future children of Africa really know who they are.

In the end when you go to China, India and even England, people really know England not because of the queen but because of its heritage and it will be a real pity to miss and to lose in Africa

africaisdonesuffering:

Thanks for getting us to 1,000 followers on Twitter! | Follow us @RiseAfrica for updates on new posts and info on upcoming events

africaisdonesuffering:

Thanks for getting us to 1,000 followers on Twitter! | Follow us @RiseAfrica for updates on new posts and info on upcoming events

yagazieemezi:

Afromysterics: Laolu Senbanjo

Afromysterics’ style of art transcends art mediums and is also an expression of the thoughts and mysteries of music, vocals, and sounds.

More here

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

descentintotyranny:

Desmond Tutu — We need an apartheid-style boycott to save the planet
We must stop climate change. And we can, if we use the tactics that worked in South Africa against the worst carbon emitters
Apr. 10 2014

Twenty-five years ago people could be excused for not knowing much, or doing much, about climate change. Today we have no excuse. No more can it be dismissed as science fiction; we are already feeling the effects.
This is why, no matter where you live, it is appalling that the US is debating whether to approve a massive pipeline transporting 830,000 barrels of the world’s dirtiest oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. Producing and transporting this quantity of oil, via the Keystone XL pipeline, could increase Canada’s carbon emissions by over 30%.
If the negative impacts of the pipeline would affect only Canada and the US, we could say good luck to them. But it will affect the whole world, our shared world, the only world we have. We don’t have much time.
This week in Berlin, scientists and public representatives have been weighing up radical options for curbing emissions contained in the third report of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The bottom line is that we have 15 years to take the necessary steps. The horse may not have bolted, but it’s well on its way through the stable door.
Who can stop it? Well, we can, you and I. And it is not just that we can stop it, we have a responsibility to do so. It is a responsibility that begins with God commanding the first human inhabitants of the garden of Eden “to till it and keep it”. To keep it; not to abuse it, not to destroy it.
The taste of “success” in our world gone mad is measured in dollars and francs and rupees and yen. Our desire to consume any and everything of perceivable value – to extract every precious stone, every ounce of metal, every drop of oil, every tuna in the ocean, every rhinoceros in the bush – knows no bounds. We live in a world dominated by greed. We have allowed the interests of capital to outweigh the interests of human beings and our Earth.
Throughout my life I have believed that the only just response to injustice is what Mahatma Gandhi termed “passive resistance”. During the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, using boycotts, divestment and sanctions, and supported by our friends overseas, we were not only able to apply economic pressure on the unjust state, but also serious moral pressure.
It is clear that those countries and companies primarily responsible for emitting carbon and accelerating climate change are not simply going to give up; they stand to make too much money. They need a whole lot of gentle persuasion from the likes of us. And it need not necessarily involve trading in our cars and buying bicycles!
There are many ways that all of us can fight against climate change: by not wasting energy, for instance. But these individual measures will not make a big enough difference in the available time.
People of conscience need to break their ties with corporations financing the injustice of climate change. We can, for instance, boycott events, sports teams and media programming sponsored by fossil-fuel energy companies. We can demand that the advertisements of energy companies carry health warnings. We can encourage more of our universities and municipalities and cultural institutions to cut their ties to the fossil-fuel industry. We can organise car-free days and build broader societal awareness. We can ask our religious communities to speak out.
We can actively encourage energy companies to spend more of their resources on the development of sustainable energy products, and we can reward those companies that do so by using their products. We can press our governments to invest in renewable energy and stop subsidising fossil fuels. Where possible, we can install our own solar panels and water heaters.
We cannot necessarily bankrupt the fossil fuel industry. But we can take steps to reduce its political clout, and hold those who rake in the profits accountable for cleaning up the mess.
And the good news is that we don’t have to start from scratch. Young people across the world have already begun to do something about it. The fossil fuel divestment campaign is the fastest growing corporate campaign of its kind in history.
Last month, the General Synod of the Church of England voted overwhelmingly to review its investment policy in respect of fossil fuel companies, with one bishop referring to climate change as “the great demon of our day”. Already some colleges and pension funds have declared they want their investments to be congruent with their beliefs.
It makes no sense to invest in companies that undermine our future. To serve as custodians of creation is not an empty title; it requires that we act, and with all the urgency this dire situation demands.

descentintotyranny:

Desmond Tutu — We need an apartheid-style boycott to save the planet

We must stop climate change. And we can, if we use the tactics that worked in South Africa against the worst carbon emitters

Apr. 10 2014

Twenty-five years ago people could be excused for not knowing much, or doing much, about climate change. Today we have no excuse. No more can it be dismissed as science fiction; we are already feeling the effects.

This is why, no matter where you live, it is appalling that the US is debating whether to approve a massive pipeline transporting 830,000 barrels of the world’s dirtiest oil from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. Producing and transporting this quantity of oil, via the Keystone XL pipeline, could increase Canada’s carbon emissions by over 30%.

If the negative impacts of the pipeline would affect only Canada and the US, we could say good luck to them. But it will affect the whole world, our shared world, the only world we have. We don’t have much time.

This week in Berlin, scientists and public representatives have been weighing up radical options for curbing emissions contained in the third report of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The bottom line is that we have 15 years to take the necessary steps. The horse may not have bolted, but it’s well on its way through the stable door.

Who can stop it? Well, we can, you and I. And it is not just that we can stop it, we have a responsibility to do so. It is a responsibility that begins with God commanding the first human inhabitants of the garden of Eden “to till it and keep it”. To keep it; not to abuse it, not to destroy it.

The taste of “success” in our world gone mad is measured in dollars and francs and rupees and yen. Our desire to consume any and everything of perceivable value – to extract every precious stone, every ounce of metal, every drop of oil, every tuna in the ocean, every rhinoceros in the bush – knows no bounds. We live in a world dominated by greed. We have allowed the interests of capital to outweigh the interests of human beings and our Earth.

Throughout my life I have believed that the only just response to injustice is what Mahatma Gandhi termed “passive resistance”. During the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa, using boycotts, divestment and sanctions, and supported by our friends overseas, we were not only able to apply economic pressure on the unjust state, but also serious moral pressure.

It is clear that those countries and companies primarily responsible for emitting carbon and accelerating climate change are not simply going to give up; they stand to make too much money. They need a whole lot of gentle persuasion from the likes of us. And it need not necessarily involve trading in our cars and buying bicycles!

There are many ways that all of us can fight against climate change: by not wasting energy, for instance. But these individual measures will not make a big enough difference in the available time.

People of conscience need to break their ties with corporations financing the injustice of climate change. We can, for instance, boycott events, sports teams and media programming sponsored by fossil-fuel energy companies. We can demand that the advertisements of energy companies carry health warnings. We can encourage more of our universities and municipalities and cultural institutions to cut their ties to the fossil-fuel industry. We can organise car-free days and build broader societal awareness. We can ask our religious communities to speak out.

We can actively encourage energy companies to spend more of their resources on the development of sustainable energy products, and we can reward those companies that do so by using their products. We can press our governments to invest in renewable energy and stop subsidising fossil fuels. Where possible, we can install our own solar panels and water heaters.

We cannot necessarily bankrupt the fossil fuel industry. But we can take steps to reduce its political clout, and hold those who rake in the profits accountable for cleaning up the mess.

And the good news is that we don’t have to start from scratch. Young people across the world have already begun to do something about it. The fossil fuel divestment campaign is the fastest growing corporate campaign of its kind in history.

Last month, the General Synod of the Church of England voted overwhelmingly to review its investment policy in respect of fossil fuel companies, with one bishop referring to climate change as “the great demon of our day”. Already some colleges and pension funds have declared they want their investments to be congruent with their beliefs.

It makes no sense to invest in companies that undermine our future. To serve as custodians of creation is not an empty title; it requires that we act, and with all the urgency this dire situation demands.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

"The word “art” is something the West has never understood. Art is supposed to be a part of a community. Like, scholars are supposed to be a part of a community… Art is to decorate people’s houses, their skin, their clothes, to make them expand their minds, and it’s supposed to be right in the community, where they can have it when they want it… It’s supposed to be as essential as a grocery store… that’s the only way art can function naturally."

— Amiri Baraka  (via westindians)

(via planetfaraway)

universalequalityisinevitable:

Dr. James Gilligan on crime, revenge, and punishment, from this video.

(via deucetrey11)

"I know too much and not enough."

— Allen Ginsberg (via larmoyante)

(via xx-blackpanther)

dynamicafrica:

Red Origins: This awesome animated kickstarter needs your help and support.

Red Origins is an original animation created both Onyi and Obi Udeh (O.0 Brothers? Yes). The two started working on Red Origins as a hobby two years ago before they realized they had written a fun and exciting story that retold African Oral Folklore and introduced Juju to the world. Onyi and Obi then created Kolanut Productions, an independent production company, in order to bring their characters to life. Now with your help Kolanut Productions can bring this original series to life.

We are raising funds to pay animators, writers, and editors to put out a top quality pilot episode for Red Origins. We currently have several artist on standby waiting for us reach our financial goals. After we finish the pilot we will use our access to various networks to get Red Origins aired. If the network route isn’t to our advantage then the Red Origins team will put out a web based series. We are determined to share this story with the world at all costs (that we can afford).

dynamicafrica:

If you have a twitter account and plan on logging in sometime tomorrow (Thursday) be sure to join Dynamic Africa for our newly launched weekly #DATalk series.
Tomorrow’s topic is centered on the experiences of African students (anywhere in the world) who are either currently attending tertiary institutions, have recently graduated, or are looking to enter university in the next year. Additionally, if you’re not African but have studied at an African university, you’re welcome to share your experiences too.
Watch this space to know when the convo kicks off tomorrow!
Connect with Dynamic Africa on:
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter
All Africa, All the time.

dynamicafrica:

If you have a twitter account and plan on logging in sometime tomorrow (Thursday) be sure to join Dynamic Africa for our newly launched weekly #DATalk series.

Tomorrow’s topic is centered on the experiences of African students (anywhere in the world) who are either currently attending tertiary institutions, have recently graduated, or are looking to enter university in the next year. Additionally, if you’re not African but have studied at an African university, you’re welcome to share your experiences too.

Watch this space to know when the convo kicks off tomorrow!

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

ATTN: Graphic Designers!

africaisdonesuffering:

We’re seeking a graphic designer for promotional material for an upcoming event. E-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com if interested!