africaisdonesuffering:

The Best of Rise Africa
From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.
We are still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system in preparation of our October 2nd launch, but we wanted to dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations that were produced through Rise Africa and our collective community.


Keep your eye open for re-visits of our most popular posts including creative short stories, intelligent think pieces, and inspiring interviews with your favorite up and coming young Africans!

africaisdonesuffering:

The Best of Rise Africa

From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We are still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system in preparation of our October 2nd launch, but we wanted to dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations that were produced through Rise Africa and our collective community.
Keep your eye open for re-visits of our most popular posts including creative short stories, intelligent think pieces, and inspiring interviews with your favorite up and coming young Africans!

dynamicafrica:

In Photos: The Agbogbloshie Problem.

Waste management in many African countries is a major problem.  From littering, to proper sewer and refuse disposal, air pollution and even access to clean water, the basic needs of many African citizens are ignored by those responsible for for carrying out these services. Across the leadership spectrum, from local municipalities and national governments, these failures often fall into a larger and highly disturbing trend of citizen neglect within many African countries.

Forced to  resort to their own initiatives, it’s not unsurprising to hear and see people across the continent carrying out their own form of waste management and address the health and sanitation issues in their own communities, leading to both negative and positive consequences. Although many are familiar with the West’s portrayal of Somali pirates as money-hungry gun-toting kidnappers (see: Captain Phillips), their story is much more complex than that. It begins with the dumping of toxic waste by and the looting of their seas by foreign countries, and progresses with action by local Somali’s attempting to defend their coastline. Similarly, in southeastern Nigerian where oil pollution remains a continuous health hazard and danger to the surrounding flora and fauna, bands of militant groups such as MEND took up arms against the local government and private oil companies responsible for the exploitation of their resources.

Although not as drastic, in terms of the use of arms, as the above examples, Ghana is another such country were citizens have found their own way to deal with toxic and improper disposal of waste in their communities.

Over the past several years, various images and documentaries have highlighted one area of the country in particular. In what was once a wetland and recreation area, e-waste now mars the former picturesque landscape, causing mass-scale pollution in the process. Agbogbloshie is the world’s biggest e-waste site that the around 40, 000 settlers have nicknamed ‘Sodom and Gomorrah’. Most of the ‘workers’ here are young men aged between 7-25 who sift through the e-waste in search of resellable materials, such as copper, earning around $2.50. As a result of the intense and toxic labour they engage in, many of these young men succumb to a myriad of diseases such as untreated wounds, back and joint problems, damage to their lungs and other internal organs, eye issues, chronic nausea, anorexia, respiratory problems, insomnia, and worst of all, cancer.

Even in countries like South Africa with better health infrastructure, miners face a similar dilemma where, faced with unemployment, many are exposed to hazardous conditions through their work and the lifestyle that migrant life facilitates.

With little to no access to basic and adequate healthcare, many often succumb to these illnesses. Not only does the waste have a direct impact on both the short- and long-term health of nearby residents, aesthetically, Agbogbloshie is far from a pretty site. Where small mounds and sizeable heaps of rubbish in Lagos disturb me when walking the cities hot and humid busy streets, I can only imagine how this ugly site and the government neglect psychologically affects those forced to accommodate it.

The images above are from a photographic study carried out by Kevin McElvaney and featured on Al Jazeera’s website.

What I love most about these photos is that, whether intentionally or not, McElvaney features most of the single individual photos on a make-shift ‘podium’ (resourcefulness, once again) almost as if to say that these people are above the rubbish that surrounds them. Not only in a literal sense, but in a figurative sense as well. 

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram  | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

All Africa, All the Time

thinkmexican:

Mexicans Continue Corn Planting Tradition

Throughout the Eastside of Salinas, and many other Mexican communities in the United States, the tradition of planting corn continues. Whether it’s a small milpa in the backyard or a couple of plants in the front or side of the house (or even apartment building), many Mexican households find the way to at least plant a couple of stalks of corn this time of year. Seems fitting considering corn was created in Mexico’s Tehuacán Valley, and that Mexicans are known as the “People of Corn.”

If you planted corn at home this year and would like to share photos, feel free to send them to us!

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

  • Men: Not ALL men.
  • Men to their daughters: Yes, all men. Every single one of them.
breakfastburritoe:

ordon-village:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the water drops look like stars.


THIS FUCKED ME UP FOR 3 DAYS

breakfastburritoe:

ordon-village:

stunningpicture:

Lobster in a bucket looks like a gigantic monster on a metallic planet, and the water drops look like stars.

THIS FUCKED ME UP FOR 3 DAYS

(via another-mans-garden)

There is no Black power without the empowerment of Black women.

(Source: proteinpills, via another-mans-garden)

gradientlair:

My humanity is not debatable.
afro-dominicano:

zenkitty714:

unlockaflockofwords:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.  Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

IT GENUINELY IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT BLACK PEOPLE GET IMPRISONED WAY THE HELL MORE THAN WHITE PEOPLE. THIS IS HOW SLAVERY CARRIED THE FUCK ON.

For-profit prisons are a huge business and this is part of why. 
Also, did you know that it’s in the Constitution that people convicted of crimes can be used as slave labor? That’s another part of the Constitution that needs to be changed. 

If you changed that part of the constitution you’re essentially removing a strong leg of the prison industrial complex

afro-dominicano:

zenkitty714:

unlockaflockofwords:

angry-hippo:

socialismartnature:

The food you eat or brush you’re using may have been made by a worker earning less than a dollar an hour — not in the developing world, but in the invisible workforce inside America’s prisons. Share this if you oppose prison labor for profit.

Source: http://ow.ly/iwTlY

When I was in prison I worked 3 shifts a day, 5 days a week, starting at 5 AM and ending at 8 PM. I was paid $5.25 a month. Pay for the inmates who facilitate UNICOR workers (by making their food, washing their laundry, etc,) is even lower than the wages cited in the above graphics. The prison industry is also a slave industry, and it isn’t just corporations who benefit. All the furniture you see in federal buildings, post offices, DMVs, etc, where do you think it comes from? Prison labor. I think a lot of people know about states that use prison labor for license plates, but fewer people know that the plaques on doors at city halls, and sometimes the doors themselves, come from prison labor. The incarcerated are a hyper-exploited class unto themselves, and almost no one seems to be helping them to organize.

IT GENUINELY IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT BLACK PEOPLE GET IMPRISONED WAY THE HELL MORE THAN WHITE PEOPLE. THIS IS HOW SLAVERY CARRIED THE FUCK ON.

For-profit prisons are a huge business and this is part of why. 

Also, did you know that it’s in the Constitution that people convicted of crimes can be used as slave labor? That’s another part of the Constitution that needs to be changed. 

If you changed that part of the constitution you’re essentially removing a strong leg of the prison industrial complex

(via thashining)

yagazieemezi:

The YAGAZIE Lunch Series

I have been in Lagos for over five months now and it has not been without its challenges. Lagos is bursting at the seams with activity and life and I wanted to contribute to the bee hive. Ever since my YouTube and blogging days, I have eagerly awaited the opportunity to create a space for young African women to gather and freely talk. With this step, I hope to work towards creating a safe space for young women to discuss several issues revolving around mental health, sexuality, eating disorders and other personal and social issues.

Personal stories flew back and forth across the tables and I was a bit taken aback by the willingness to share. Success. Here in Nigeria, it is so common to hear the youth openly discuss politics, academics, pop culture, etc, but when the time comes to talk about personal issues such as mental health, sexuality, abuse, we hush up. We go behind close doors to talk softly while the majority of us choose not to talk at all. But these are issues that affect us as individuals. (Keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via ourafrica)

Anonymous said: these anons are like, "can i be racist in the rain? can i be racist on a train? can i be racist in a box? can i be racist with a fox?"

bitchcraftandwiggatry:

lackadaisicallexicon:

thesoftghetto:

surrealexperiences:

cyb3ranthy:

incogneeco:

whiteoppression:

famphic:

anthotny:

postracialcomments:

lmfaoooooooooooooo Yes!

Lmao!
How can I be racist if I work with blacks
How can I be racist if one sold me slacks
I’m not racist I’m just like you. I’m best friends with a black or two.

i’m not racist, you see, it’s just a preference
i love eastern culture and its women’s deference
the west lost its way with no room for clemency
If I love Asian women, how’s that white supremacy?

i’m not a racist, i can’t be, you see
my great grandma’s grandma was part cherokee
plus one time i got called “cracker” to my face
don’t we all bleed red? i don’t even see race…

I’m not racist, blacks just need to stop complaining
Living in the past and white people blaming
I work hard, no handouts for every little fraction
If white privilege isn’t fair, then how is affirmative action?

I’m not racist man, I’m just right-wing
Plus reverse-racism is totally a thing
It’s not about power check the definition
Slavery wasn’t an evil thing, just asset acquisition.

How come I can’t say “nigga”, it just means brotha!
And ain’t I a brotha from anotha motha?
I didn’t use the ‘er’- so its a total difference.
You blacks give good white people such hindrance :(

'We can't handle spicy foods' ? Your jokes make me sad

See, if I joked and called you a “nigger”, you’ll be mad

You black people think we are always out here to ruin your day

Look, 'not all white people', …mmkay?

I can say “nigga” ‘cause of freedom of speech

And y’all always forget what MLK preached!

White privilege ain’t real ‘cause my life is hard

If you want to stop racists, don’t play the race card

I say enough about you. We all have pain!
I’m freaking Jewish, so this goes without saying
Your president is black but still you people fuss
I mean, it’s not like you’re still sitting at the back of the bus

Tags: everything